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How far would 1 million HawaiianMiles take you around the Hawaiian Islands? Well, let’s just say one person could travel between any of the islands as many as 133 times.*

In celebration of ‘Ohana by Hawaiian’s fifth anniversary of service between Honolulu and Moloka‘i and Lāna‘i, our employees have commemorated the milestone by gifting 1 million HawaiianMiles each to two nonprofit organizations that greatly benefit the islands’ residents. Servicing some of the state’s smallest and most rural islands, the Moloka‘i Cancer Fund and Lāna‘i Kina Ole both rely on our fleet of ATR-42 twin-engine turboprop aircraft to help their clients access medical services and supplies that are not readily available within their communities.

Meet ‘Ohana by Hawaiian’s fifth anniversary nonprofit recipients:

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‘Ohana By Hawaiian Managing Director Alanna James, pictured center in purple, and the Moloka‘i Cancer Center team gathering in celebration of the recent donation.

 

Moloka‘i Cancer Fund assists cancer patients by providing access to medical services, lodging and transportation. Volunteers also help secure air travel for patients to visit treatment centers located throughout the state. 


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Lāna‘i Kina Ole's Valerie Janikowski (pictured left) accepting the donation check from ‘Ohana by Hawaiian Managing Director Alanna James.

 

Lāna‘i Kina Ole, a human services organization, provides kupuna (elderly) and their families free home health care and medical support by a team of registered nurses and certified nursing assistants.

“We consider ourselves caretakers of Lāna‘i’s kupuna but, as a small community, can face limitations due to the island’s shortage of medical facilities,” said Valerie Janikowski, a registered nurse and program administrator at Lāna‘i Kina Ole. “Hawaiian Airlines’ donation has helped us tremendously in growing our organization, getting our staff trained, and connecting our patients with medical professionals on the Neighbor Islands to get the medical attention they need.”

“These organizations play an instrumental role in the well-being of Lāna‘i and Moloka‘i’s communities and it’s been an honor to celebrate our milestone year alongside their teams,” said Alanna James, managing director of ‘Ohana by Hawaiian at Hawaiian Airlines. “Looking at the next five years and beyond, we will remain focused on providing our high standard of service and Hawaiian hospitality that our kama‘āina and visiting guests rely on.”

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Team Kōkua volunteers at Lāna‘i Kina Ole’s inauguration and community celebration event.

 

In addition to the 1 million-mile donations, Team Kōkua, our employee volunteer group, assisted Lāna‘i Kina Ole’s staff in inaugurating and blessing its first office, located in the heart of Lāna‘i City. Volunteers set up seating areas and tents, made ice cream cones, and hosted the event’s raffle table at the community event hosted by the nonprofit.

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‘Ohana by Hawaiian, operated by Empire Airlines, first launched service between Honolulu’s Daniel K. Inouye International Airport and Moloka‘i Airport and Lāna‘i Airport in Spring 2014. The service successfully rounded out our robust Neighbor Island network of jet flights connecting Kaua‘i, O‘ahu, Maui and the Island of Hawai‘i. Today, ‘Ohana by Hawaiian offers five daily round-trip flights between Honolulu and Lāna‘i City and three daily round-trip flights between Honolulu and Ho‘olehua on Moloka‘i.

Our dedication to serving Hawai‘i's communities didn't stop there. In 2016, we expanded ‘Ohana by Hawaiian's service with daily flights between Honolulu and Kapalua Airport in West Maui. 

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Gate-side festivities during the ‘Ohana by Hawaiian's inauguration of service between Honolulu and Kapalua Airport in West Maui.

 

Hawai‘i artist Sig Zane created the livery of the ATR-42 fleet, leveraging our interisland route map as the inspiration behind the design. The livery encompasses three core kapa patterns: piko, representing ancestor and progeny; manu, representing both a bird in flight and the prow of a canoe, the traditional form of migration; and kalo (taro), representing family.

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* This figure is based on the lowest award tier for Neighbor Island travel. The full award chart can be viewed here.