HONOLULU, February 5, 1999 - After its first full day of taking reservations for travel in the year 2000, Hawaiian Airlines (ASE and PCX: HA) reported that it experienced no technical problems with the booking process.

In keeping with industry practice, Hawaiian Airlines begins taking seat reservations 331 days in advance of flight departure dates. February 4 was the first day that reservations could be made on Hawaiian Airlines for travel during 2000. Hawaiian uses SABRE, the computer reservations and operating system owned and operated by American Airlines parent AMR Corp.

Paul J. Casey, Hawaiian Airlines President and CEO, said Hawaiian wanted to alert its customers to make their year-end travel plans soon. "As expected, demand for travel during the holiday period this year is extraordinarily high because of the new millennium. Seats are booking rapidly, so we urge everyone to make their plans as soon as possible," Casey said.

Casey said Hawaiian's aggressive company-wide effort to prepare all of its systems and operations for the millennium transition are progressing well. "We are on track to being ready well in advance of the New Year and don't expect to have any 'Y2K' operational problems."

Hawaiian Airlines in 1996 began a program to replace its major operating computer systems with 'Y2K compliant' technology. Since then, the company has conducted exhaustive studies to identify, evaluate and remedy technological and administrative Y2K issues, including those relating to software, hardware and all of the equipment used in day-to-day operations.

Hawaiian is also working closely with its partners and vendors, the Federal Aviation Administration, airports, and national industry organizations such as the Air Transport Association in a coordinated effort to ensure uninterrupted air service through the transition into 2000.

The airline expects to spend more than $10 million converting systems to Y2K compliant technology.

Now in its 70th year, Hawaiian Airlines is Hawaii's longest-serving and largest airline and the nation's 12th largest carrier. Hawaiian's fleet of McDonnell Douglas DC-9s provides award-winning service on more than 150 jet flights daily among the islands of Hawaii. Hawaiian also operates widebody DC-10 flights daily between Hawaii and the U.S. mainland. Its South Pacific service links Honolulu with American Samoa and Tahiti.